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Alphabetical
Listing


The Alphabet
The Numbers

UNIT 1

Part 1
Sign language
Hello
What
Your
Name
Where
From
You
Nice
Meet
Please
Happy
Sad
Understand
Deaf
Hearing
Father
Mother
Girl
Boy
Good
Bad
Thank you
Friend
Best Friend
How
Me
Feel
Sympathy
Touch
Fine
Tired
Angry
Need
Help

Part 2
Go there
School
College
University
Gallaudett
Fingerspell
Grandfather
Grandmother
Wife
Husband
Brother
Sister
Uncle
Aunt
Cousin
Baby
Son
Daughter
Live
Do
Farm
Farmer
Teach
Teacher
Learn
Student
In
Out
On
Off
With
Without
Work
Yesterday
Today
Tomorrow
Week
Month
Year
Yes
No
Why
Right
Wrong
Know
Dont know
Think
Forget
Remember
Great
Bored
Read
Write
Science
Math
Book
Library
Study
Paper
Pencil
Homework
Problem
Class
Group
Family
Team

Part 3
Doctor
Nurse
Medical
Hospital
Medicine
Shot
Ambulance
Appointment
Surgery
Late
Not yet
Later
Time
Early
Wait
Room
Office
Sit
Chair
Stand
Fall
Get_up
Walk
Pain
Headache
Sick
Nose
Go there
Many
A lot
When
Happen
About
And
Love
I love you
Like
Don't like
Want
Don't want
For
Talk
Say
Tell

Part 4
Story
Morning
Noon
Afternoon
Night
All day
All night
But
Different
Same
Food
Eat
Picnic
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Milk
Coffee
Meat
Potato
Bread
Vegetable
Orange
Orange juice
Apple
Sandwich
Hamburger
Pizza
Salad
Cheese

Part 5
Truck
Supplies
Career
Explain
Expert
Excited
Interesting
Veterinarian
Animal
Sheep
Horse
Donkey
Dairy
Area
Goat
Pig
Feed
Carry
If
Travel
Dog
Cat
Bird
Tiger
Lion
Elephant
Deer
Moose
Alligator

Part 6
President
Run
Rain
Snow
Waitress
America USA
Worry
Visit
Hungry
Arrive
Beautiful
Cold
Restaurant
Indian
Place
Maybe
Ask
My
Now
Home
Car
Drive
See
Every-day
Two-of-you

Part 7
Future
Past
Fun
Cheerleader
Bus
Practice
Act
Play
Sell
Store
Shopping
Gas
Okay
First
Last
Second
Credit card
Finish
Order
Get
Important
That
Decide
Have
To
Can
Try
Can't

Part 8
Garden
Flower
Grass
Rose
Seed
Few
Things
Plant
Grow
Spring
House
Back
Tomato
Lettuce
Corn
Tree
Peach
Sure
Kind
Health
Healthy
Thin
Mixture
Spots
Business
Question
Information
Recommend
Advice
Move
Follow

Part 9
Myself
Insurance
Telephone
Damage
Show you
Wow
Park
Near
This
Note
None
Responsible
Upset
Black
Find
Deductible
Fix
Above
Pay
Before
Scratch
Gone
Paint
Color

Part 10
Vacancy
Bedroom
Recently
New York
Alone
Goldfish
Furniture
Bring
Any
Anything
Electric
Garbage
Next
Marry
Laundry
Wash
Garage
Washing manchine
Hook up
All right
One hundred
Monthly

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dDeaf World

Dedicated to teaching the American Sign Language.
Click a word in menu and a movie shows how to "sign" that word.
This site also includes practice tutorials to test your skills
in learning Sign Language for the deaf.

 



This site is dedicated to the memory of Harley R. Lee who originally designed and produced
this site and gave so much of himself to the advancement of the learning of the
American Sign Language.  Harley Lee, 84, passed away on July 10, 2012.
I.S.G.S. is proud to sponsor his work in this field.


Sponsored by Internet Stained Glass Supply


TO USE THIS PAGE (WORDS LISTED BY PARTS):

Choose selected words at the left organized by Parts.

You can also learn some of the numbers and the alphabet by clicking on the appropriate link.

To practice or test yourself on what you have learned, click on "Practice" at the left.


SIGNING INFORMATION

Sign Area    Clear Signs    ASL syntax    This page    ASL origin

FACIAL EXPRESSION:
In signing, facial expression is very important in conveying the meaning of the communication. When signing the word "SAD" one should have a sad expression. When signing the word "HAPPY" there should be a smile to help deliver the meaning. The face, along with body language, should help give the meaning whenever possible.

SIGNING AREA:
Most signs are given in front of the chest and just below the face, so that the reader can see your facial expressions while watching your signs. Try to keep the hands centered on the chest and just below the face for most general signs except when a particular sign calls for movements to other areas.
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CLEAR SIGNING
Some people have the urge to move their hands in a down and up motion for each letter or word. That makes reading much harder. Generally, keep the hands still from such movements. Signs need not be overly large.
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ASL SYNTAX
Strict ASL requires that the time element of a sentence, if there is one, comes first followed by the topic, then the verb etc.. As an example: in speaking one might say, "I SAW A BEAUTIFUL RED CAR YESTERDAY." If that word order were used while signing, people would not know what you are signing about until the end of the sentence.

Strict ASL uses French syntax which gives the time element, then the topic up front. This same sentence in sign language would be: "YESTERDAY CAR BEAUTIFUL RED SAW I."

Although this page uses ASL syntax most of the time and in learning ASL you need to be aware of the correct word order, you need not concern yourself too much by trying to stick strictly to that word order. Deaf and hard-of-hearing people are flexible enough to understand ASL using English syntax.
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UNDERSTANDING THIS PAGE:
In this program, italic words or letters are used to describe the shape of your hand to use while making each sign. As an example "using your right p hand" means to use your right hand forming the shape of the letter "p" from the signing alphabet while making this sign. "Using your right bent hand" means to use your right hand in a bent shape while making this sign.
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ORIGIN OF THE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet was a Philadelphia born theology student of French ancestry who became interested in helping deaf people of the United States. He went to France where a sign language was already established. After learning that language, he and a French colleague developed the American Sign Language patterned after the French version.

For this reason ASL (American Sign Language) uses French syntax. In ASL the time element, if there is one, comes first followed by the topic, then the verb etc..

After learning ASL you can most likely communicate easily with deaf French people, with only one difficulty: when letters are used in a sign, the French people will use the first letter from the French word while English speaking people will use the first letter from the English word. As an example the ASL sign for "people" uses both hands shaped like the sign letter "p," whereas the French will use both hands shaped like the sign letter "g" in the same manner, because the French word for people is "gens."

Now the good news: many words that don't require a letter in their signing; such as "good," "thank-you," "have," "know" etc.; are the same in French and American sign languages. You can speak French and didn't know it!
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